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Welcome to the Missouri University of Science and Technology's Explosives Engineering site! 

DID YOU KNOW?

More than 6-billion pounds of
explosives is used in the U.S.
each year--most of which is in mining.

Missouri S&T continues its long tradition as a leading academic institution in training and educating the world's experts in explosives engineering. Current offerings include Graduate and Undergraduate explosives  certificates, an explosives engineering minor, an Explosives Engineering MS and now a PhD in Explosives Engineering. Under the wing of the Missouri S&T Mining Department, the rapidly expanding program focuses on broad industry and student needs; offering coursework covering the use of explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics in fields including mining, construction, defense, homeland security, demolition, oil recovery, fireworks, special effects and more. Learn how to become an explosives engineer and explore unique opportunities at the world's most renowned explosives school, Missouri S&T

But to get a better idea of the hands on experience we have to offer, see what the New York Times has to say about the first and still most hands on "explosives camp" for high school students and how our experimental mine topped Popular Science's 'awesome labs' ranking for back to back years

We have assembled a very comprehensive web site with over 50 separate pages and documents.  We hope you will find the program specific information you are searching.  

Use the navigation menu on the left to learn more about the only program of its kind, Explosives Engineering at Missouri S&T.

Hot off the press: PhD in Explosives Engineering is approved by Missouri CBHE morning 6th February 2014

Hot off the press: New Assistant Professor in Explosives Engineering advertisement approved (see news)

 

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DESERT EXPLORER

Michael Bouchard studies bizarre dome-like structures in Egypt's Afar Desert.

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GOING THE DISTANCE

Marathon runner Devin Dixon sped through three degrees in just over six years.

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MINING ON THE MOON

Dr. Leslie Gertsch takes a look at humanity's future in space.

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D-DAY RE-EXAMINED

John McManus' latest book looks at the Big Red One at Omaha Beach.

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LIFE ON MARS

Melanie Mormile studies bacteria here on Earth that could survive on Mars.

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SPELUNKING FOR A CAUSE

Michael Bradford helps protect bats and cave formations in Missouri.

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SLIMY STUFF

Paul Nam suggests the potential solution to several global problems is green slime (algae).

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DANCING WITH CODE

Marquia Lewis studies computer science and is a member of the Gold Miners dance squad.

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CRAFT-Y MAGAZINE EDITOR

Casey Burton works to improve cancer screenings and publishes a gamer magazine.

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A GOALIE'S PERSPECTIVE

Carrie Levy enjoys the mental challenge of being a Lady Miner goalkeeper.

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A PHILOSOPHY OF ADVOCACY

Kate Burns is proof that students in every major can find success.

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PHYTOFORENSICS

Joel Burken's research team use trees to detect soil and groundwater contamination.

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ROCKET SCIENTIST

Anan Takroori shares his love of planes, rockets and satellites with campers.

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'DOWN-TO-EARTH' SCHOLAR

Krista Rybacki studies soil samples from an area near a lead recycling smelter.

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MINERS ABROAD

Delancey Rougely studied the effects of war in France and blogged about it.

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